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Pot Limit & No Limit Poker : Play Poker

    Notice the way this hand was played, I was never in such a situation where I had to panic about getting broke or being bluffed. I would have probably made the same amount of money if I had bet on the flop and continued betting because it is likely that he would have called both on fourth street as well as on the flop and in the end released the hand. Since, the free card you give is not an overcard, aces are the best poker hand to play in the fashion I described.

(10) We will look at the below mentioned hand which is from the 1982 World Poker Championship. You have A♣-Q♥, and are in the big blind. James Moss- three times World Poker Champion opens under the gun for $700 and Sam Moon calls. You decide to call as it was only $500 more to you. The flop comes Q♠-7♥-2♥, giving you top pair with an ace kicker. You lead at the pot for $1,000, Moss calls, and Moon folds. 3♥ is the next card, making a three-flush on board. Again, you lead at the pot for $4,000, and James Moss calls. A blank- 6♠ is the last card. You have a bit more than what John has in front of him ( nearly another nine grand.) Should you check or put Moss all-in and what does Moss hold are the questions which need to be answered.

Answer:- check(10)    bet(5)

Explanation:- It is almost certain that James Moss’s hand is a big pair, either kings or aces, likely with a heart that can make a flush on the last card. It would be a bluff if you bet as it is obvious that you do not hold the winning hand. Whether to bluff or not is a tricky question?

    Trying to run a World Poker Champion off a big pair was not a good poker strategy so I checked the hand. Moss checked it back and showed down two red kings. In the end, would Moss have called $9,000? Later, that night at dinner, I asked him this question.

    He replied that he did not know and also added that probably he would not have liked it. I was sure that I did the right thing, but there is no method to know this for sure. In situations where the rival poker player is weak, I would prefer to save my bluffs and not trying to induce a big laydown.

(11) You are playing in the 1982 World Poker Championship. On the start of third day, you have about $22,000 in chips, which is a short stack for this late in the poker tournament. The eventual winner of the poker tournament and a highly aggressive poker player- Jack Strauss is on your immediate right. Since, Jack has over quarter of a million in front of him; this allows his throttle to go full out. You pick up A♣-8♥, and are in the big blind. The structure is $100 ante, $200 and $400 blind, so there is about $1,400 in the pot to start. What should you do when all the poker players fold around to Jack, who opens for $4,000 bet?

Answer:- raise(10)  fold(2)  call(1)

Explanation:- Since, Jack does not need to have anything in this spot, raise him all your money. Rather than just calling the blind or throwing his hand away, it is likely that he would raise on any two cards. For your present circumstances, it is fine holding even though you don’t have any great shakes of a hand for an ordinary situation. Essentially, against a random hand, you are heads-up and hold an ace which is a sure shot ticket for a short stack.

    Since, you are so committed to the pot that you would have to call a reraise, it is correct if you raise all your money rather than a portion. Strauss held K♣-9♣ on the actual deal which is far stronger hand than the average hand. But still, he decided to fold. As it generally happens, a king was coming on the flop and if you would not have run him out, you would have lost the pot. ( This was during the good old days when rabbit hunting was allowed in poker tournaments).

(12) You are asked to play the detective in this problem. Where did I make a mistake? At the 1987 World Poker Championship $10,000 buy-in event, I was at the final table. Frank Henderson, Johnny Chan and me were the three poker players left to fight it out for the title. I was the chip-leader with $665,000, Chan had $225,000 and Henderson the remainder, about a quarter million. The structure was now a $2,000 ante and blinds of $10,000 and $20,000. I picked up A♦-4♦, and was in the big blind. John called on the button and Frank also called. I raised $85,000 more and I was surprised as John called the raise. The flop came K♣-J♠-4♣, giving me only bottom pair. By betting $185,000, I made a sort of semi-bluff. With the quickness of a pouncing tiger, Chan moved all-in on me by making a $240,000 raise. After thinking for a long time the probability that he would be on a draw seemed remote. However, it definitely looked like an ace or four would win the pot for me and make me a huge favorite to become the World Poker Champion. I called the raise as I was almost getting the right odds and even if I lost the pot, I would still be in the hunt. We faced our hands, and John showed a K♥-Q♠. I became the first poker player in the game’s history to lose a pot with over a million dollars in it as I failed to draw out. I finished third as a short while later, I lost another pot. Johnny Chan became the 1987 World Poker Champion. Where did I make common poker mistake?

Answer:- betting flop(10) calling raise(5)  preflop raise(1)

Explanation:- I believe that my pre-flop raise was quite appropriate as you cannot sit still in your chair the price of $36,000 every three deals. My call on the end which was mathematically unsound on the actual hands was also quite reasonable.

    The chances of my rival poker player drawing were remote, and there was a chance to get out of having to play heads-up against possibly the world’s best no-limit hold’em poker player if I got lucky and drew out. However, my bet on the flop cannot be justified. What kind of hand limps in and then calls $85,000 more?

    Having played a lot of poker with John, I am sure that if he had a pocket pair, he would have reraised me playing threehanded. It was likely for him to have big card which would fit the flop of K-J-4. Even though, I played my best poker in that poker tournament, a little mistake cost me the poker tournament- and the World Poker Champion title. Still, one of the greatest thrills of my life was my experiences at the final table.

Scoring:-  120 = perfect
    110-118 = very strong
    100-109 = good poker player
    90-99 = not bad
    80-89 = need more study
    less than 80 = bring lots of money

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