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Pot Limit & No Limit Poker : Play Poker

Pot-Limit Poker Omaha Quiz

(1). Holding (i) A♠ K♣ J♦ 9♥ or (ii) A♠ K♣ J♦ 9♠  (a) Before you have ever acted, you face a raise and a reraise. (b) Having stood a raise or made it yourself and now facing a reraise in the return action. (c) Facing only the blind bet in the late position.

1. and 2. – a. Pass (2). Call (0) Raise (-10). You are getting only 3-2 for your money and it is likely that you are facing aces.

1. – b. Pass (2). Call (1) Raise (-10). A call can be considered as you have 2-1 or 3-1 for your money.

2. – b. Call (2) Pass (1) Raise (-10). Not all poker players reraised just with aces as it depends on the rival poker player.

1. and 2. – c. Raise (2) Call (0) Pass (-10). Don’t be afraid.

(2). Holding 8♣ 7♥ 6♣ 5♥ a. Facing only the blinds b. Facing multihanded action.

a. Raise (2) Call (1) Pass (-10). A raise will disguise the premium poker hand which you have. It would be very courageous on your part if you intend to reraise after checking when some other poker player takes the action.

b. Call (2) Raise (0) Pass (-10). It is very uncommon to get a good poker hand like this. The chances of this happening are as rare as aces double suited. But, do you really want poker players to pass? This is a playing poker hand. However, the back door draw outs are relatively minor out here. Hence, you have the chance to outplay the rival poker player if there is still action.

(3). Holding a. A♥ 7♣ 7♥ 2♦ b. A♥ 7♣ 7♠ 2♥. Facing only the blinds.

a. Pass (2) Call (0) Raise (-5). If you are trying to snap off the blinds in late position, we tend to think that a raise is better than a call. It is almost impossible to hit the nuts as the poker hand is useless.

b. Pass (2) Call (2) Raise (-10). You can hit the nut flush and once in a while you will hit something exciting like K♥ 7♥ 3♠. It is foolish to raise and a reraise will drive you out.

(4). Holding 10-8-7-6 a. Facing only the blinds. b. Facing a bet.

a. Call (2) Pass (0) Raise (-5). b. Call (2) Pass (1) Raise (-10).

The poker hand is not better than 8-7-6. The broken off spot is too high. A much better poker hand is 10-9-8-6.

(5). 5♥ 4♠ 3♥ 2♠. a. Facing only the blinds. b. Facing a raise with several poker players still to act.
a. Call (2) Pass (1) Raise (-9)   b. Pass (2) Call (0) Raise (-10)
For a tiny all-in coup, this is fine. However, it is well nigh impossible to hit the nuts when there is action to come after the flop.

(6). J♥ J♣ 9♠ 6♥. a. Facing a bet in early position.   b. Facing a bet and raise

a. Pass (2) Call (1) Raise (-9)   b. Pass (2) Call (-2) Raise (-10).
You are hoping to hit a jack. Change the 6♥ to the 7♥ if you are in a loose poker game and your poker hand is more appetizing. Still, you must pass in b.

(7). This poker hand is very interesting. We will see all the poker cards out here and decide what action each poker player should have taken in this actual poker hand. Holding K Q J 9 double suited.
Raise (2) Call (2) Pass (-10). This is a strong poker hand which is hidden by the early attack.
Dennis, an up and down poker player holding 7-5-3-2 double suited.
Raise (-10) Pass (2) Call (-5). George called.
I held 9-9-4-4 single suited.
Raise (-10). Pass (-2) Call (2). I called.
Tim the best poker player in the British Isles, holding kings single suited.
Raise (-2) Pass (-10) Call (2). He called.
Rusty, a solid and astute, holding aces.
Raise (2) Call (0) Pass (-10). He had position with the best poker hand and indeed raised.
Back to Dennis, with his K-Q-J-9 double suited.
Call (2) Pass (-2) Raise (-10). This poker hand is still extremely strong and Derek does not need to have aces.

Now, George with his 7-5-3-2 double suited.
Call (-10) Pass (2) Raise (-20). George should have passed as this poker hand has far too many gaps. Even though most poker players had high poker cards, he was not tempted.
1, with two pair; 9-9-4-4 single suited.
Call (2) Pass (2) Raise (-20) As I was getting 4-1 for my money, I must hope to flop a set about 22% of the time. A pass would have been more discreet than my usual call as this is rather marginal.
Tim, with his pair of kings. The pot would be $1000 if he called and he had only $500 left. All the other poker players were playing with much more money.
Call (2) Raise (0) Pass (10). Tim actually raised. The other three poker players would follow the suit if Derek had called. If Derek raises, he has aces, and the best Tim can hope for is to be left alone. Why not flop?

Derek had $2500 left and the pot now stood at $1500.
Raise (2) Call (-3)   Pass (-20). Obviously, Derek raised all-in, the full pot with his aces.
Dennis had $14,000 left.
Call (2)     Pass (2)    Raise (-10). The poker hand is becoming rather marginal.
George had $2,800 left.
Call (-10)     Pass (2)    Raise (-12). The poker odds are just not there. I had more than $14,000 left.
Raise (2) Pass (2)    Call (-2). In England, the two pair is dubbed as “Tim’s poker hand”. The reason for this is that Tim once said that he wanted to see all the five poker cards as he did not want to play guessing game with this poker holding. By the end of the pot, two pair make trips about 34% of the time. Naturally, they might not win. The pot stood at $9000 and it was $2500 to me. It is clear that I have the pot odds if I can reach the river. Tim is almost surely marked with kings. Derek has aces. George’s poker hand is a mystery. However, Dennis’s is clearly a drawing poker hand. Against any poker pair, any such holding must be less than even money. I had to be blocking raise than just call. I raised the pot of $11,500 because passing is better than calling.
Dennis, hanging on.
Pass (2)    Call (-2). Dennis should have understood that at least six of the poker cards he was seeking were held by other poker players. Time is marked with kings, Derek with aces and myself with another picture pair and probably two other such poker cards. However, Dennis called as the heat of the battle got to him. Obviously, George called for his last $300.
The boardcards: A 6 6 8 2.

Therefore, Derek and I each made a profit of about $8,800. I would have lost $2500 if Dennis had played correctly and passed. If a K,Q or J had come at any stage, Dennis would have won. However, Tim needed to play more accurately with more money and for my foolhardy poker play, I needed to cover the poker table.

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